The Ferrari 296 GTB is the first road-going Ferrari to pack a V6 engine, but it’s not the first V6 Ferrari made – that’s because the company developed a V6 for racing in the late 1950s. and even put it in some road cars, but it was never called a Ferrari. And none of the road cars he entered …

So today we bring you five things you might not have known about the fantastic Dino V6 engine that was developed by Ferrari but never appeared in a Ferrari brand road car …

It was developed for racing first

The Ferrari 246 F1 was a development of the Dino 156 F2 and was the only Dino V6 powered car to wear a prancing horse on its nose.

Provided

The Ferrari 246 F1 was a development of the Dino 156 F2 and was the only Dino V6 powered car to wear a prancing horse on its nose.

While the Dino V6 is perhaps best known for appearing in the painfully pretty Dino 206 GT and later 246 GTs and GTSs (often mistakenly referred to as the “Ferrari Dino”), as well as other cars that weren’t not Ferraris either, it was actually designed and developed as a racing engine and has appeared in a number of racing cars over the years.

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The idea for a Ferrari V6 came after Enzo Ferrari’s son Alfredo (called “Dino” by his father) and Ferrari engineer Vittorio Jano convinced Enzo to develop a car for the Formula racing series. 2 which changed to the 1.5-liter engine regulation for the 1957 season.

Enzo agreed, and a 65-degree V6 (Dino’s idea – Jano wanted a traditional 60-degree V) was developed in 1956 to be ready for the 1957 season.

It was named after the son of Enzo Ferrari

Enzo's son Alfredo 'Dino' Ferrari was the man behind a Ferrari V6, but he died before he could see it working.

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Enzo’s son Alfredo ‘Dino’ Ferrari was the man behind a Ferrari V6, but he died before he could see it working.

Sadly, discussions with Dino Ferrari about the engine took place when he was hospitalized with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and he died in 1956 before the engine was even running.

As a result, Enzo decided to name the engine – and even the cars he appeared in – after him, establishing the Dino sub-brand for his smaller V6-powered racing cars – and ultimately the road cars, while Ferrari would remain exclusively V8 and V12.

Ferrari has unveiled its first V6-powered sports car since Dino’s days.

The first racing car was the 1957 Dino 156 F2 for the Formula 2 series, but the Dino V6 will remain in competition until 1975 in F2, Sportscar racing, sports prototypes and rally (more information soon …), even making its way to this part of the world in the Dino 246 Tasmania, built by the factory to participate in the 2.5-liter Tasman series driven by kiwi legends Graeme Lawrence and Chris Amon.

There was a A Ferrari brand car that would use the Dino V6 – a development of the 156 would be used in Formula 1 as the Ferrari 246 F1 in 1958, where it won the world championship at the hands of Mike Hawthorn. Quite the exception.

The first road car in which it was used was a Fiat

The sexy Fiat Dino was the first road car to use the Dino V6.  Ferrari's Dino sub-brand would hit the roads a year later.

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The sexy Fiat Dino was the first road car to use the Dino V6. Ferrari’s Dino sub-brand would hit the roads a year later.

In 1965, the FIA ​​changed the homologation rules for the F2 so that the engines had to be based on a production engine for 1967. Worse, the engine had to be produced in 500 road cars within 12 months, and there was no way to do it. arrive for Ferrari.

Enzo therefore made a deal with Fiat to build the 500 engines and use them in an “unspecified GT car” for the road. It would become the incredibly sexy Fiat Dino from 1966. The Dino V6 was enlarged to 2.0 liters and was hooked up to a 5-speed manual transmission.

Things didn’t quite go in Ferrari’s direction, as he wanted to build the V6s in Maranello, but Fiat management insisted on taking control of production and moving it to Turin. Ferrari’s Dino 206 GT would debut a year later, and although Ferrari claims it produced 20hp more than the Fiat, the engines were all running on the same production line in Turin …

The last car it was used in was a Lancia

The impressive Lancia Stratos was the last racing and road car to use the Dino V6, as Ferrari had replaced it with the Dino V8 when it abandoned the Dino sub-brand.

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The impressive Lancia Stratos was the last racing and road car to use the Dino V6, as Ferrari had replaced it with the Dino V8 when it abandoned the Dino sub-brand.

In keeping with the Dino V6’s habit of never landing in a road car bearing the Ferrari name, it is only fitting that the last vehicle it was used in was the mighty Lancia Stratos HF.

After Ferrari replaced the Dino V6 with the V8 in 1973, it passed the V6 on to Lancia who quickly inserted it into what would become one of the most iconic rally cars of all time. Apparently Lancia had wanted the Dino V6 early in the development of the Stratos, but Enzo was reluctant to let them use it as he viewed the Stratos as a competitor to his own cars, but the introduction of the Dino V8 changed dramatically. ‘notice.

By this time, the Dino had been enlarged to 2.4 liters, and in the featherweight Stratos (it weighed between 900 and 950 kg, depending on configuration) would go on to win 18 WRC races and three world championships before being finally retired. in 1975.

His replacement was a V8 that would become the backbone of Ferrari

Replacing the V6 would continue to do great - and incredibly powerful - things.  Like powering the mighty F40.

Provided

Replacing the V6 would continue to do great – and incredibly powerful – things. Like powering the mighty F40.

In 1973 Ferrari replaced the Dino 246 with the beveled Dino 308 GT4 based on the 246, but with a new Dino engine – a 3.0-liter V8 – but it was more important for what it was to become; namely the first production Ferrari with a V8.

How? ‘Or’ What? Well, in 1976 the Dino sub-brand was retired and the 308 GT4 officially became a Ferrari, but the Dino V8 would dominate the future of the company. In turbocharged form it would appear in the mighty 288 GTO, as well as the legendary F40, while it would continue for almost 30 years, doing its service in every Ferrari V8 until the 360 ​​Modena 2004, after which it was replaced in the F430 by the new Ferrari-Maserati F136 V8.


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